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Malaysia 777: contact lost


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#1 Independence76

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 08:35 PM

http://www.bbc.com/n...d-asia-26492748

#2 LA_PHX

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 09:02 PM

FlightRadar24 seems to have lost data on the flight about halfway across the Gulf of Thailand. Data shows sudden altitude change from FL350 to 0 feet and a change of heading (obviously there are gaps in their data stream though). There are reports flying around the internet about it landing in Nanning but China says that isn't the case and Malaysia is notifying "next of kin."

At this point, its going to be a recovery mission, rather than rescue. :/

EDIT: from FlightRadar24 Twitter:

Quote

Flightradar24 have good radar coverage in that area. Last signal was received from altitude 35000 feet

Edited by LA_PHX, 07 March 2014 - 09:11 PM.


#3 Independence76

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 09:59 PM

I'm on the phone with my bosses right now about this. We're not very optimistic.

The NTSB Go Team is on their way right now and Boeing has a direct line to MAS maintenance to see if any ACARS messages exist that could spell answers. Thank you for the information, LA_PHX.

It's 10:00 AM in Bangkok right now. Sun is up and any sign of wreckage should be visible.

#4 Tim.

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 05:03 AM

*
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View PostIndependence76, on 07 March 2014 - 09:59 PM, said:

I'm on the phone with my bosses right now about this. We're not very optimistic.

Ha, oooo look at me Mr Bigshot.

#5 flare

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 07:23 AM

This is awful :( latest report I saw was:


AviWxChasers

BREAKING: Vietnamese search planes have spotted 2 oil slicks in the sea off southern Vietnam..


They always seem pretty reliable, can only hope for the best. Prayers with the family of the passengers and crew.


#6 SergeBMW

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:14 PM

Any theories as to what might have happened?

I just read about the oil slick when I woke up this morning, doesn't sound good at all :\
I just hope its not another AF447 where it just hit the water at a suicidal speed.

#7 LA_PHX

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:51 PM

There's plenty of theories and none will be proven correct for a long time.

That said, what is most troubling to me is that two passengers with stolen passports made it aboard. Why do you board a plane with a stolen passport unless you have a poor criminal history that would prevent you from normally boarding or you have poor intentions and wish to remain anonymous? I would hope it is the former.

#8 SergeBMW

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 05:04 PM

It is 0602 near Kuala so we should be getting new reports soon since they soon will be dispatching search and rescue again as the sun rises at 0722

I doubt that oil slick on the ocean reported yesterday is part of the B772, 9 miles long is far more than is stored in a hydraulics/engine oil system of an aircraft, and Jet A is nearly crystal clear so im not sure about that idea

#9 flyhalf

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 06:18 PM

Whatever happened, happened very quickly because the way these cockpits are locked up now the crew would have time to send a distress call if something sinister was happening.

#10 Iain_

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:18 AM

Interesting that the captain was a flight simmer himself, has his own 777 set up at home.

http://www.sharelor....h-of-mh370.html

#11 Independence76

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:02 PM

View PostTim., on 08 March 2014 - 05:03 AM, said:

Ha, oooo look at me Mr Bigshot.

This will likely affect our investor relations.

If you won't take that seriously, then please just go back to your own little world and leave me alone. Thanks.


Also, thanks for representing FSW as a mature and intelligent community in a topic that requires some sensitivity. Thanks a lot.

Edited by Independence76, 09 March 2014 - 09:11 PM.


#12 shamupilot

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 01:24 AM

Everyday I pray that this is all a bad dream, but it looks like MH 307 is lost forever in the South China Sea. I'm starting to think that the "disintegration" theory is the reason why the searchers cannot find the wreckage. Oh well, hopefully the US Navy will get a deep-penetrating sonar machine over there and hopefully that'll aid in the search.

#13 Jungleland

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:32 AM

View PostIndependence76, on 09 March 2014 - 09:02 PM, said:

This will likely affect our investor relations.

If you won't take that seriously, then please just go back to your own little world and leave me alone. Thanks.


Also, thanks for representing FSW as a mature and intelligent community in a topic that requires some sensitivity. Thanks a lot.

He wasn't mocking the topic, he was mocking you.

#14 SergeBMW

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 03:40 PM

View PostIain_, on 09 March 2014 - 06:18 AM, said:

Interesting that the captain was a flight simmer himself, has his own 777 set up at home.

http://www.sharelor....h-of-mh370.html

Wow I wasnt even aware of this, its sad to know that MH307 may be lost forever with so many good poeple aboard, all gone in an instant.

Either way its just amazing how no one has been able to spot a single piece of wreckage after nearly 3 days. They said it looked like the aircraft turned back just before losing contact, at an altitude of 35,000ft and a large glide vector, what if they tried to land it somewhere after somehow losing COM  systems? Maybe they are searching in the wrong area still.

#15 Tim.

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 05:57 PM

View PostIndependence76, on 09 March 2014 - 09:02 PM, said:

This will likely affect our investor relations.

If you won't take that seriously, then please just go back to your own little world and leave me alone. Thanks.


Also, thanks for representing FSW as a mature and intelligent community in a topic that requires some sensitivity. Thanks a lot.

Does your company not have some sort of social media policy? One day it will come back to bite you.

#16 Independence76

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:07 AM

View PostTim., on 10 March 2014 - 05:57 PM, said:

Does your company not have some sort of social media policy? One day it will come back to bite you.

Considering I haven't done anything against the company and  the fact multiple companies out there (Eastern, PeoplExpress, American West Air) currently can relate to the precise problems I mentioned, it's not exactly a secret.

Edited by Independence76, 11 March 2014 - 02:08 AM.


#17 flare

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 07:56 AM

Earlier today Malaysian media reported that the plane was spotted flying at lower altitude some distance away from its intended flight path.
"The last time the flight was detected close to Pulau Perak, in the Malacca Strait, at 2.40 a.m. by the control tower before the signal was lost," air force chief Rodzali Daud told the Berita Harian newspaper.
If correct that would suggest the plane flew for an hour and 10 minutes AFTER the plane vanished from control screens.



This is all very interesting...

Edited by flare, 11 March 2014 - 07:59 AM.


#18 Independence76

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:07 PM

View Postflare, on 11 March 2014 - 07:56 AM, said:

Earlier today Malaysian media reported that the plane was spotted flying at lower altitude some distance away from its intended flight path.
"The last time the flight was detected close to Pulau Perak, in the Malacca Strait, at 2.40 a.m. by the control tower before the signal was lost," air force chief Rodzali Daud told the Berita Harian newspaper.
If correct that would suggest the plane flew for an hour and 10 minutes AFTER the plane vanished from control screens.



This is all very interesting...

The "Malaysia media" is reporting based on an eyewitness account of a fisherman. I find it completely unreliable, as some small media outlets in countries such as Malaysia will report anything as long as it gets views. Next to that, I doubt that a fisherman would be up at 2:40 AM and be able to easily spot a specific 777 in the dark from a distance. The guy probably doesn't make much money. Took him 4 days to come up with the idea of giving a "tip" for some cash.

Also, at this point in time, I find the idea of "flying beyond radar coverage" in this region next to impossible. There's a number of radios and frequencies that you can't turn off instantaneously. The "off course" theory seems unlikely as well considering the experience and passion of the Captain on board. He would have noticed something was off and reported it immediately.


Weather that night was fine. Radar coverage of that region was good. Aircraft disappeared after a sudden change in altitude to FL344 and left turn of 59 degrees.


The only other possibility in the in-flight break-up theory besides structural failure and an explosive device is contact with another unidentified object, such as a fighter from the Vietnamese AF. I'm not sure about the radar capabilities in Saigon of tracking such high speed objects, but I can imagine they'd be good considering what we've heard about their technology in general. Also, I'm not sure if fighter jets (especially in Vietnam) include TCAS or any similar signal that can be picked up by TCAS. If you're flying old-world equipment, a Boeing 777 and newer consumer radar may not pick it up.

Edited by Independence76, 11 March 2014 - 02:12 PM.


#19 LA_PHX

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:18 PM

Well if this could get any more perplexing, it is and probably will continue to. If it was terrorism causing it to turn back (by either the Iranians or anyone else) you'd expect someone to claim responsibility. If it was a mechanical problem, we now aren't expecting something explosive...but if that's the case, why no contact?

What a nightmare investigation. I'd like to know why, just now, the are thinking it turned back and looking west of Malaysia. So much time was lost over what...how long does it take to pull up military radar data?

View PostIndependence76, on 11 March 2014 - 02:07 PM, said:

Also, at this point in time, I find the idea of "flying beyond radar coverage" in this region next to impossible. There's a number of radios and frequencies that you can't turn off instantaneously. The "off course" theory seems unlikely as well considering the experience and passion of the Captain on board. He would have noticed something was off and reported it immediately.

Supposedly the radars in Malaysia, at least the non-military ones, don't operate the same as they would in the US. In the US, if an aircraft turns off its transponder, ATC will still see a primary target, just with no data. Supposedly, I read a less expensive radar system that Malaysia might have relies solely on transponder information, so without that, the aircraft really is invisible to ATC.

Don't you think if it hit another aircraft, 1. Debris would have been found in the area and 2. two aircraft would be reported missing? I think your theory is just as far out there as any other theory at this point.

#20 Independence76

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:21 PM

View PostLA_PHX, on 11 March 2014 - 02:18 PM, said:

Supposedly the radars in Malaysia, at least the non-military ones, don't operate the same as they would in the US. In the US, if an aircraft turns off its transponder, ATC will still see a primary target, just with no data. Supposedly, I read a less expensive radar system that Malaysia might have relies solely on transponder information, so without that, the aircraft really is invisible to ATC.

Wouldn't some less advanced military radar still be able to get a raw picture of the aircraft's track?

Quote

Don't you think if it hit another aircraft, 1. Debris would have been found in the area and 2. two aircraft would be reported missing? I think your theory is just as far out there as any other theory at this point.

Hence why it's merely an alternate theory. Certainly not the most likely or realistic. Besides, even if a VAF plane did go missing, it doesn't mean it would be public information.

Edited by Independence76, 11 March 2014 - 04:21 PM.